Recap of Student Images From Recent Workshops (and new workshop dates just added)

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Today, I’m posting images that were shot by students who attended relatively recent workshops.

Sometimes I don’t get to the the recap for awhile, so I’m playing catch-up!

You’ll notice that some students have more than one image. These are students that took an individual workshop, and/or stayed for an extra day of training.

I need to take a moment to say one thing; I feel very fortunate and honored that students have travelled from near and far to take a personal workshop with me!

A big THANKS goes out to every one of them!

In this recap, there is recent work by students who travelled here from: Switzerland, Ireland, India, Mexico, Brazil, Canada, as well as from all over the US: Colorado, Maryland, Minnesota, Texas, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New Mexico and Massachusetts.

I am truly humbled.

Also, I am once again so pleased and surprised to see the compositions that students come up with; things that I wouldn’t think of. This is one of the most rewarding things about teaching this amazing process.

A personal word about my workshops… I developed this process (which I call “Sculpting with Light”). It is a process that I’ve been perfecting for almost 30 years. Yes, I used light painting with film, and I developed a way to bring those concepts to a digital workflow. It is a challenging process, and the workshops are intensive; we work very hard because I want my students to leave with a deep understanding of the process. For this reason, I teach a maximum of TWO students (I also teach individuals), and this is why I teach quite a few workshops per year. I believe that a workshop such as this, where hands-on technique needs to be taught on a personal level, can only be successful if the class size is very small. It is simply impossible to go deeply into my process with a large group. What matters to me is the deep satisfaction I get from teaching photographers how to make extraordinary images – Harold

On to the images…

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Marie-France Millasson, brought this amazing red shoe with her, along with a vision of what she wanted to do. The form of the shoe is captured beautifully by light painting:

Photograph by Marie-France Millasson created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Marie-France Millasson  (Switzerland):

Marie-France also did a classic photograph of garlic, one of my favorite subjects:

Photograph by Marie-France Millasson created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Marie-France Millasson  (Switzerland)

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Chandler Barrett did something I would not normally do; he used a white piece of fabric which nestles a black teapot (one of the favorites of my collection). Only in my Sculpting with Light process can you maintain detail in these extreme subjects. I think he did a terrific job.

Photograph by Chandler Barrett created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Chandler Barrett (North Carolina)

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Morris Liss wanted to combine glass and metal, two challenging subjects. I think his result speaks for itself!

Photograph by Morris Liss created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Morris Liss  (Maryland)

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Jorge Villarreal made an unusual composition, one in which the background gets most of the real estate! I think it works beautifully.

Photograph by Jorge Villarreal created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Jorge Villarreal (Mexico)

Jorge also combined the challenging properties of metal and glass. Lighting these kinds of surfaces is covered thoroughly in the workshop, and I think Jorge’s image is simple yet beautiful.

Photograph by Jorge Villarreal created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Jorge Villarreal (Mexico)

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Laura Bennett (who came to the workshop along with her husband Doug) created this beautiful and soft image. In the workshop, we explore how to render fabric in a soft, sensuous way. Great job, Laura!

Photograph by Laura Bennett created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Laura Bennett (Colorado)

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Doug Bennett’s goal was to learn to light many different kinds of surfaces, including light coming through the champagne bottle. Nice work, Doug!

Photograph by Doug Bennett created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Doug Bennett (Colorado)

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Victor Civita was able to do two images. This simple image of a leaf, although of only one element, is quite engaging.

Photograph by Victor Civita created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Victor Civita  (Brazil)

Victor also pulled together this eclectic combination of things from my prop collection. I think he did a great job composing these disparate elements.

Photograph by Victor Civita created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Victor Civita  (Brazil)

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Sam Gray’s composition is simple, yet strong. I believe that simpler images have the potential to be more powerful than do complex images. Great work, Sam.

Photograph by Sam Gray created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Sam Gray (Pennsylvania)

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Canice Dunphy, here from Ireland for the third time, brought along some props with him. I was so excited to see this “Space Beam” Lamp! It’s right up my alley, but sadly, I couldn’t convince him to leave it here! Light Painting allowed Canice to bring up every little detail of this mid-century gem!

Photograph by Canice Dunphy created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Canice Dunphy (Ireland)

This image is another example of simplicity at its best. Look closely (click on the image for a larger view) to see the gorgeous light that Canice applied to the elements in the image.

Photograph by Canice Dunphy created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Canice Dunphy (Ireland)

Canice also brought this very old lock from Ireland. Don’t let the scale fool you; the lock is quite large, approximately 5″ x 7″.

Photograph by Canice Dunphy created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Canice Dunphy (Ireland)

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Steve Hick’s composition speaks to me; oil cans and vintage tools. What’s not to love? Very nice work, Steve!

Photograph by Steve Hicks created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Steve Hicks (New Mexico)

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Patricia Isbell brought along this great hat and hat stand. As often happens, this is a composition that I would not thought to have done, but Patricia made it work, and that is one of the most rewarding parts of teaching. This image has such character.

Photograph by Patricia Isbell created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Patricia Isbell (Texas)

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Praveen Prakash is a professional jewelry photographer from Mumbai, India. He came here to learn how light painting could help in his commercial studio. We spent several days together, and made several images, but I am not sharing the jewelry images for proprietary reasons. He also made this luminous image of one of Vera’s perfume bottles. It was very interesting to learn about his culture and to work with someone who had never been to the U.S. before!

Photograph by Praveen Prakash created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Praveen Prakash (India)

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Juleann Vanbelle did a great job working through the challenges of this rather complex setup. There were lots of surfaces here, and therefore lots of learning opportunities. I think she did a fantastic job!

Photograph by Juleann VanBelle created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Juleann VanBelle (Massachusetts)

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John Smeeton photographed one of my favorite possessions; a torch that belonged to my father. He would be so pleased to see how this simple tool is celebrated and (one might say) monumentalized by John’s composition and great lighting!

Photograph by John Smeeton created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

John Smeeton (Ontario, Canada)

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Bob Maynard chose the challenge of photographing objects that are all somewhat similar; almost everything in the image is made of wood. It’s not a problem, as in my Sculpting with Light process, we decide the brightness of every surface in the photograph. Therefore, Bob was able to create an image with depth and dimension, even though the subjects were very close in color and tone. Nice work, Bob.

Photograph by Bob Maynard created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Bob Maynard (Colorado)

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Deanne Nigro’s composition is so cool; she chose to combine elements of different surface qualities and of very different sizes, adding to the challenge of pulling off a good composition. I also love the color scheme of her image. Nice work, Deanne.

Photograph by Deane Nigro created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Deane Nigro (New Jersey)

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Naomi Johnson has it all; glass, metal, texture, patina… but the most interesting part was how she dealt with the ruler and the box, and making sure that the ruler came forward and separated from the box. Of course, we can control the brightness of every element in an image, but figuring out how bright things should be can present a challenge. I think Naomi nailed it.

Photograph by Naomi Johnson created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Naomi Johnson (Minnesota)

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Chris Jewett, also back for his third workshop, created a very eclectic grouping! I love images in which objects don’t necessarily belong together, and the task of meshing these objects through light and tone is always so interesting to me. Once again, I love to see compositions that I would not think to do myself. Terrific work, Chris.

Photograph by Chris Jewett created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Chris Jewett (Maryland)

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Jack Upchurch pulled a fast one on me. In the workshop, I strive to keep the sets as simple as possible, yet there needs to be enough complexity for teaching opportunities. We had Jack’s set close to being worked out, and as I was working with the other student (I only have two students per workshop), I looked over at Jack’s set and saw this little human model sitting on it! Jack brought it with him, and snuck it in there, but I’m so glad he did, as the little guy is a perfect subject with which to teach the nuances of lighting and masking! Thanks, Jack, for bringing your little friend, and for adding in that hip implant!

Photograph by Jack Upchurch created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Jack Upchurch (Maryland)

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I like to say that the workshop is not about making a masterpiece, but is designed to teach a process and a way of thinking about light. I believe that my “Sculpting with Light” process is very transformative, and the images of ordinary objects shot by my students is a testament to that.

There are three ways to take a workshop with me:

Join a regularly scheduled workshop (new dates just added), see the schedule HERE.

If you have a friend or partner / spouse, you can set up your own workshop dates. More information HERE.

Take an individual workshop, and set up your own dates. More information HERE.

All images from students over the years are HERE.

For general workshop information please click HERE .

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~ by Harold Ross on February 14, 2018.

8 Responses to “Recap of Student Images From Recent Workshops (and new workshop dates just added)”

  1. Some wonderful images here, Harold…thanks for sharing them with us! You certainly have some talented students’

  2. Great work, congratulations.Harold Ross, you are the one!!

  3. A very impressive collection of beautiful images. Congratulations to you and your students!

  4. Terrific work! Really interesting pieces. They are also a testament to your excellence as a teacher!

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