Recap of Student Images From Recent Workshops (and new workshop dates just added)

•February 14, 2018 • 8 Comments

As always, if you’re viewing this in an email, please click the title of this post to see the blog, which offers a better viewing experience.

*****

Today, I’m posting images that were shot by students who attended relatively recent workshops.

Sometimes I don’t get to the the recap for awhile, so I’m playing catch-up!

You’ll notice that some students have more than one image. These are students that took an individual workshop, and/or stayed for an extra day of training.

I need to take a moment to say one thing; I feel very fortunate and honored that students have travelled from near and far to take a personal workshop with me!

A big THANKS goes out to every one of them!

In this recap, there is recent work by students who travelled here from: Switzerland, Ireland, India, Mexico, Brazil, Canada, as well as from all over the US: Colorado, Maryland, Minnesota, Texas, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New Mexico and Massachusetts.

I am truly humbled.

Also, I am once again so pleased and surprised to see the compositions that students come up with; things that I wouldn’t think of. This is one of the most rewarding things about teaching this amazing process.

A personal word about my workshops… I developed this process (which I call “Sculpting with Light”). It is a process that I’ve been perfecting for almost 30 years. Yes, I used light painting with film, and I developed a way to bring those concepts to a digital workflow. It is a challenging process, and the workshops are intensive; we work very hard because I want my students to leave with a deep understanding of the process. For this reason, I teach a maximum of TWO students (I also teach individuals), and this is why I teach quite a few workshops per year. I believe that a workshop such as this, where hands-on technique needs to be taught on a personal level, can only be successful if the class size is very small. It is simply impossible to go deeply into my process with a large group. What matters to me is the deep satisfaction I get from teaching photographers how to make extraordinary images – Harold

On to the images…

*****

Marie-France Millasson, brought this amazing red shoe with her, along with a vision of what she wanted to do. The form of the shoe is captured beautifully by light painting:

Photograph by Marie-France Millasson created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Marie-France Millasson  (Switzerland):

Marie-France also did a classic photograph of garlic, one of my favorite subjects:

Photograph by Marie-France Millasson created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Marie-France Millasson  (Switzerland)

*****

Chandler Barrett did something I would not normally do; he used a white piece of fabric which nestles a black teapot (one of the favorites of my collection). Only in my Sculpting with Light process can you maintain detail in these extreme subjects. I think he did a terrific job.

Photograph by Chandler Barrett created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Chandler Barrett (North Carolina)

*****

Morris Liss wanted to combine glass and metal, two challenging subjects. I think his result speaks for itself!

Photograph by Morris Liss created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Morris Liss  (Maryland)

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Jorge Villarreal made an unusual composition, one in which the background gets most of the real estate! I think it works beautifully.

Photograph by Jorge Villarreal created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Jorge Villarreal (Mexico)

Jorge also combined the challenging properties of metal and glass. Lighting these kinds of surfaces is covered thoroughly in the workshop, and I think Jorge’s image is simple yet beautiful.

Photograph by Jorge Villarreal created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Jorge Villarreal (Mexico)

*****

Laura Bennett (who came to the workshop along with her husband Doug) created this beautiful and soft image. In the workshop, we explore how to render fabric in a soft, sensuous way. Great job, Laura!

Photograph by Laura Bennett created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Laura Bennett (Colorado)

*****

Doug Bennett’s goal was to learn to light many different kinds of surfaces, including light coming through the champagne bottle. Nice work, Doug!

Photograph by Doug Bennett created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Doug Bennett (Colorado)

*****

Victor Civita was able to do two images. This simple image of a leaf, although of only one element, is quite engaging.

Photograph by Victor Civita created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Victor Civita  (Brazil)

Victor also pulled together this eclectic combination of things from my prop collection. I think he did a great job composing these disparate elements.

Photograph by Victor Civita created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Victor Civita  (Brazil)

*****

Sam Gray’s composition is simple, yet strong. I believe that simpler images have the potential to be more powerful than do complex images. Great work, Sam.

Photograph by Sam Gray created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Sam Gray (Pennsylvania)

*****

Canice Dunphy, here from Ireland for the third time, brought along some props with him. I was so excited to see this “Space Beam” Lamp! It’s right up my alley, but sadly, I couldn’t convince him to leave it here! Light Painting allowed Canice to bring up every little detail of this mid-century gem!

Photograph by Canice Dunphy created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Canice Dunphy (Ireland)

This image is another example of simplicity at its best. Look closely (click on the image for a larger view) to see the gorgeous light that Canice applied to the elements in the image.

Photograph by Canice Dunphy created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Canice Dunphy (Ireland)

Canice also brought this very old lock from Ireland. Don’t let the scale fool you; the lock is quite large, approximately 5″ x 7″.

Photograph by Canice Dunphy created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Photograph by Canice Dunphy (Ireland)

*****

Steve Hick’s composition speaks to me; oil cans and vintage tools. What’s not to love? Very nice work, Steve!

Photograph by Steve Hicks created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Steve Hicks (New Mexico)

*****

Patricia Isbell brought along this great hat and hat stand. As often happens, this is a composition that I would not thought to have done, but Patricia made it work, and that is one of the most rewarding parts of teaching. This image has such character.

Photograph by Patricia Isbell created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Patricia Isbell (Texas)

*****

Praveen Prakash is a professional jewelry photographer from Mumbai, India. He came here to learn how light painting could help in his commercial studio. We spent several days together, and made several images, but I am not sharing the jewelry images for proprietary reasons. He also made this luminous image of one of Vera’s perfume bottles. It was very interesting to learn about his culture and to work with someone who had never been to the U.S. before!

Photograph by Praveen Prakash created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Praveen Prakash (India)

*****

Juleann Vanbelle did a great job working through the challenges of this rather complex setup. There were lots of surfaces here, and therefore lots of learning opportunities. I think she did a fantastic job!

Photograph by Juleann VanBelle created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Juleann VanBelle (Massachusetts)

*****

John Smeeton photographed one of my favorite possessions; a torch that belonged to my father. He would be so pleased to see how this simple tool is celebrated and (one might say) monumentalized by John’s composition and great lighting!

Photograph by John Smeeton created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

John Smeeton (Ontario, Canada)

*****

Bob Maynard chose the challenge of photographing objects that are all somewhat similar; almost everything in the image is made of wood. It’s not a problem, as in my Sculpting with Light process, we decide the brightness of every surface in the photograph. Therefore, Bob was able to create an image with depth and dimension, even though the subjects were very close in color and tone. Nice work, Bob.

Photograph by Bob Maynard created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Bob Maynard (Colorado)

*****

Deanne Nigro’s composition is so cool; she chose to combine elements of different surface qualities and of very different sizes, adding to the challenge of pulling off a good composition. I also love the color scheme of her image. Nice work, Deanne.

Photograph by Deane Nigro created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Deane Nigro (New Jersey)

*****

Naomi Johnson has it all; glass, metal, texture, patina… but the most interesting part was how she dealt with the ruler and the box, and making sure that the ruler came forward and separated from the box. Of course, we can control the brightness of every element in an image, but figuring out how bright things should be can present a challenge. I think Naomi nailed it.

Photograph by Naomi Johnson created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Naomi Johnson (Minnesota)

*****

Chris Jewett, also back for his third workshop, created a very eclectic grouping! I love images in which objects don’t necessarily belong together, and the task of meshing these objects through light and tone is always so interesting to me. Once again, I love to see compositions that I would not think to do myself. Terrific work, Chris.

Photograph by Chris Jewett created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Chris Jewett (Maryland)

*****

Jack Upchurch pulled a fast one on me. In the workshop, I strive to keep the sets as simple as possible, yet there needs to be enough complexity for teaching opportunities. We had Jack’s set close to being worked out, and as I was working with the other student (I only have two students per workshop), I looked over at Jack’s set and saw this little human model sitting on it! Jack brought it with him, and snuck it in there, but I’m so glad he did, as the little guy is a perfect subject with which to teach the nuances of lighting and masking! Thanks, Jack, for bringing your little friend, and for adding in that hip implant!

Photograph by Jack Upchurch created at Harold Ross Light Painting Workshop

Jack Upchurch (Maryland)

*****

I like to say that the workshop is not about making a masterpiece, but is designed to teach a process and a way of thinking about light. I believe that my “Sculpting with Light” process is very transformative, and the images of ordinary objects shot by my students is a testament to that.

There are three ways to take a workshop with me:

Join a regularly scheduled workshop (new dates just added), see the schedule HERE.

If you have a friend or partner / spouse, you can set up your own workshop dates. More information HERE.

Take an individual workshop, and set up your own dates. More information HERE.

All images from students over the years are HERE.

For general workshop information please click HERE .

*****

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Brush, scissors and razor…

•January 22, 2018 • 17 Comments

As always, if you’re viewing this in an email, please click the title of this post to see the blog, which offers a better viewing experience.

 

I love playing with the idea of scale. Sometimes it can be obvious; other times more subtle.

I’ve had these beautiful forged scissors for awhile, and I finally got a chance to photograph them. I decided to have a little fun with mixing the scale and function of these vintage objects, which are connected in some ways, but not in others.

Once again, I’m taken by what is revealed when we look closely.

 

Photographer Harold Ross's Light Painted Photograph

Photograph by Harold Ross

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Beaulieu R16 Movie Camera

•January 8, 2018 • 15 Comments

Happy New Year everyone. I hope that you all have a healthy and productive 2018!

As always, if you’re viewing this in an email, please click the title of this post to see the blog, which offers a better viewing experience.

I’ve always been a still photographer, and have never really been into motion imagery, but that said, I’ve always admired the design of certain movie cameras. Some of my very favorites are the vintage iterations of the Beaulieu movie cameras. The design and function of these cameras is unparalleled. In some ways, they remind me of one of my prized cameras, an early 1950’s Rolleiflex Twin Lens, which I used extensively in the “good old days.”

Over the decades that I’ve collected cameras, I’ve not been an aggressive collector. I feel very fortunate that many of my vintage cameras have been given to me by friends, family or clients, and so, I’ve never found a Beaulieu to add to my collection.

My friend Jim Ryan has just changed that! He generously gave me two cameras that he owned (and used) and that represent the pinnacle of their genres; a Linhof Technica V 4×5 field camera, and a Beaulieu R16 (Circa mid 1960’s). Some history of the Beaulieu Company is HERE.

In my excitement, I decided to photograph the movie camera right away! These cameras are now the crown jewels of my collection.

Thank you, Jim!

 

Harold Ross's Light Painted Photograph of a Beaulieu R16 Camera

Photography by Harold Ross

 

 

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In Washington D.C. for the STANDOUT Photo Gallery event.

•November 14, 2017 • 6 Comments

As always, if you’re viewing this in an email, please click the title of this post to see the blog, which offers a better viewing experience.

If you are in the nation’s capital today (Tuesday, Nov. 14th) please stop by the Stand Out Photo Gallery event. See top of the line equipment demos by Digital Transitions, Large Format Aluminum Dye-Sub prints by Blazing Editions, Phase One cameras, Eizo Monitors, and more. And meet the wonderful folks behind these great brands.

There will be four speakers (myself included) throughout the day, starting at 1:30PM (doors open at 1:00PM). Click the banner below to see the lineup.

It’s at Studio52 DC, 1508 Okie Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20002

In connection with this event, I (just last week) had to opportunity to test drive the amazing Phase One XF Camera System. What a camera this is. It even has a built in seismograph to check for floor stability! The files are incredible, and at 100MP, like nothing I’ve ever seen.

I decided to photograph a vintage fire extinguisher, as well as a “construction” that I made, and I also shot a short video of some of the light painting of the latter. You’ll hear the metronome that I use to help me count as I light paint. In this video, I’m using a wand to light the gear and “wing”, and I’m trying to get the correct ratio (for me) between the edge highlights and the softer frontal light:

And here are the final images (click to see larger):

Harold Ross's Light Painted Image "Construction #1"

“Construction #1”

Photography by Harold Ross

 

Harold Ross's Light Painted Image "Vintage Fire Extinguisher"

“Vintage Fire Extinguisher”

Photography by Harold Ross

To see more of my work, please visit www.haroldrossfineart.com

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I’ll be speaking at Phase One’s STAND OUT Photo Gallery Event – Wash., D.C. – Nov. 14th

•November 3, 2017 • 4 Comments

 

As always, if you’re viewing this in an email, please click the title of this post to see the blog, which offers a better viewing experience.

 

If you’re in or near Washington, D.C. on November 14, I’ll be speaking at Phase One’s  Stand Out Photo Gallery Event on November 14th! I’d love to see you there!

The event is being held from 1pm to 8pm, and features 4 speakers (myself included), and there will also be a live shoot available throughout the day, allowing you to experience the amazing Phase One Camera System along with other photo equipment.

My presentation is from 1:30pm – 2:30pm and there are 3 other speakers:

Josef Blazar – owner of Blazing Editions, a leading fine art printmaking company

Joseph Cartright – accomplished Beauty and Fashion Photographer

Steven Friedman – award winning Landscape Photographer

You’ll have the opportunity to view large printed medium format photography displayed in a gallery setting and hear from the artists behind the work.

Beginning at 6pm is the exhibit, wine and cheese networking, demo and giveaways!

Stand Out Photo Gallery Events are designed to inspire, educate and motivate photographers.

You can find out more and register for the event HERE. The cost is only $25!

Check out and subscribe to their Instagram feed at:

#standoutphotoevents

https://www.instagram.com/standoutphotoevents/

 

 

 

 

 

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A vintage surveyor’s tool… The Gurley Transit

•October 14, 2017 • 14 Comments

As always, if you’re viewing this in an email, please click the title of this post to see the blog, which offers a better viewing experience.

To me, vintage surveying tools are wonderful. They are, in essence, telescopes, but with a specific and practical purpose, and although quite complex in their design, they were expected to produce very precise results.

If I had unlimited space (and funds), I’d probably own a huge collection of these beautiful creations, and I would store them alongside my similarly huge collection of vintage oil cans. This would all be housed in a big steampunk warehouse!

OK, back to reality…

When I saw this surveyor’s transit, I fell in love with it, but I’m not quite sure when it was made. It does have a “T.V.A.” (Tennessee Valley Authority) stamp on it, so one might assume that it is no older than 1933, and there is a serial number which indicates a 1910 manufacture date, but the transit itself looks like it might be from the 1960’s.

If anyone knows the age of it, please let me know!

Apparently, the transits made by the Gurley Company (in Troy, New York) are rather hard to date accurately.

The Gurley Company began making surveying instruments in 1852, and they made thousands of them. They are known for their accuracy and reliability in the field.

In any case, I decided to photograph this example, using light painting, of course.

I was hoping to capture the intricate mechanical details (and the spirit) of this amazing piece of equipment.

Photographer Harold Ross' light painted image of a Vintage Gurley Transit

The Gurley Transit, Photograph by Harold Ross

 

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Student Images From Our Recent Group Workshops.

•September 9, 2017 • 7 Comments

Hello all,

As always, if you’re viewing this in an email, please click the title of this post to see the blog, which offers a better viewing experience. You can click on any image to get a carousel view.

Although I don’t get to it often enough, I always enjoy posting results from our group workshops. My workshop attendees always managed to surprise and delight with their interpretations and compositions.

I like to say that the goal of the workshop is not to make a masterpiece, but to learn how to make a masterpiece. That said, I’m constantly amazed at the level of quality of the images that my students create.

The images load onto this page in random order… each time you refresh the page, the order and sizing will be different. I think it’s kind of fun to see the random juxtapositions; also there is no possible way for me to have favorites; they are all terrific!

All images from students over the years are HERE.

 
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